Makeup and Skin Care for Acne

We put a lot of time, effort, and money into looking beautiful (or handsome, depending on your gender). Americans fork over nearly $9 billion annually for creams, scrubs, concealers, and a drawer-full of other cosmetics that claim to keep our skin looking clean, clear, and more youthful.
Ironically, the very same products you rely on to keep your skin looking its best could be doing your pores a big disservice. Using the wrong makeup or cream could actually accentuate the pimples you're trying so hard to hide.
Caring for "acne-prone skin" requires some careful cosmetic sleuthing -- reading labels to find products that won't clog your pores and lead to more breakouts

When to See Your Doctor About Acne

Many of us turn to drugstore products to combat breakouts, which is a great first line of defense. However, no two pimples are alike, and a dermatologist is able to provide customized advice and treatment options for acne sufferers. Not sure if your bump in the skin care road warrants a doctor’s appointment? Answering yes to any of these three questions may be the best indicator that it’s time to see a dermatologist.

Have over-the-counter creams, gels, and cleansers stopped working ?

Mild to moderate acne will often go away in four to six weeks with the use of drugstore creams, gels, and cleansers that contain benzoyl peroxide and/or salicylic acid, says Paradi Mirmirani, MD, a dermatologist in Vallejo, Calif. But stubborn, more severe cases of acne may require the expertise of a dermatologist.

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